Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
MSNBCW 17
CNBC 2
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. let me start with this. i have a message for the tea party members everywhere, destroying government is not good politics. you are engaged in negative politics. you are acting against the majority rule right now. you are trying to bring down the majority government by obstruction. people will remember. whot won tax relief. people who believe in government will remember. the people who believe in national defense and social security and medicare will remember. they will know which party is trying to destroy working democracy in order to pursue its political ends. they will know who listens to the voter, who respects the voter, and who thumbs his nose at the voter and that ladies and gentlemen of the tea party right is you. we go over this cliff and you will not have to ask for whom the bell tolls, it willing tolling for you. leading off tonight josh green and chris frats of national journal. you don't have to be as clear as i, but try, gentlemen, tonight. it looks to me like one party, guns again it's asymmetric. both parties are not screwing around, one is. is that true? >> i think b
can move forward? >> well, first of all, we have to be able to govern. we have to have an adult conversation, getting people in the room who actually want to solve this problem. and i think it's very important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own pla
and there will also be spending cuts to government programs as well as the military and that will be spread over with 2013 and the world doesn't come to an end if we go over this quote, unquote, fiscal cliff and instead, a lot of the damage gets spread out and congress does have the power to go back and fix things. >> is it more important that the payroll tax holiday will go away and that is another thing that will end up happening. >> the payroll tax holiday will be a temporary sting, and it was crafted in 2010 and that is right in the waning days of the 111th congress when they still held in control the house of representatives and all of the counter proposals and counter proposals, and house speaker john boehner and the offers we have on the table don't deal with the payroll tax holiday and they go up to people on the amount of money they put in the social security trust fund and that is your payroll tax and those will go up and pretty much regardless if we get a deal or we don't. >> mark murray from d.c., breaking it down for us and the senior editor, thank you, sir. >> as lawmakers in d.c.
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
geithner says the government will hit the debt ceiling on monday and he is launching an emergency plan to avert a crisis. amm eamon javers is live. what do we know? >> the president is coming back early, a couple days earlier than his vacation. did a little bit of jogging, working out in the gym over his vacation. now he will be,ing would out on this fiscal cliff. the senate is coming back and the house of representatives is going to have a conference call for all republicans later on today and then yesterday, we saw the secretary of the treasury, tim geithner, announced the $16.4 trillion debt limit is going to be reached by monday, that was a little bit surprising to people who haven't been following this kind of thing and raises the stakes for the fiscal cliff end game because the white house had wanted a debt ceiling deal as part of the overall deal here on the fiscal cliff. republicans have been resisting that by announcing the debt ceiling limit will be held on monday, ratchets up the pressure to include the debt ceiling piece in the final package, whatever that may be, but still
fiscal cliff deal. meantime, treasury warns the government will hit its legal borrowing limit by monday. it's thursday, december 27th, 2012 and "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning and welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm andrew ross sorkin along with joe kernen. becky continues to have the day off today. our guest host today is bob broska. house speaker john boehner urging the senate to come up with a passable fiscal cliff solution. he's promising to at least consider any bill that the upper chamber produces. senate majority leader harry reid now expected to base any legislation on a bill passed earlier this year to continue tax breaks for households will incomes below $250,000. a senate bill would likely contain an extension of expiring unemployment benefits. and the other big news of the morning, treasury secretary tim geithner unveiling a plan to buy time under the debt ceiling. in a letter to congress, geithner saying that treasury is going to begin taking steps this week to delay hitting the government's 16$16.4 trillion borrowing limit. treasury will tak
this israeli government is so spoiled and has shift sod far to the right it makes no effort to take u.s. interest into account. and i agree with that. when netanyahu moved and cut off any chance of a united west bank government, he basically took a step that was completely in the face of u.s. policy going back to george w. bush. >> that's true. i think one of the things to be keep in mind is this pre-nomination process seems to have gotten completely out of control. where congress has too much to say who the presumptive nominees that any president offers forth. over history only 20 cabinet nominees have been knocked back. seven have been rejected and 13 have withdrawn those names. seven of those have happened under the past three administrations. so i think there's something wrong with this whole process where a presumptive nominee is litigated in public and the -- >> how do you avoid this? how do you do it? >> he's got to make a decision. obama has either got to nominate him when he gets back to washington tomorrow or move on. >> is this the vetting process we've got now? in other wo
the government down if you remember in 2011. they didn't care. the president compromised. we finally came up with a deal. when we came to the debt ceiling. and beginning to pay our bills. and continuing to pay our bills. they didn't really care. i think that's what they were set out to do. to close the government. we are in a season where we need to act. >> you, congressman -- >> on something concrete. >> i didn't mean to interrupt you there but it sounds like you think it's a deliberate attempt to take the economy, the government. >> yeah. 55. the tea party members. not john boehner. john boehner's allowed himself to be captured by the fellows. he is above and beyond that. i think he's basically trying to do the right thing but he can't get a vote out of his own party for his own legislation. who does he turn to? the president of the united states? more worried about getting a proposition from the president to turn down then what proposition is he talking about? i think the president has been more than willing to compromise and the democrats in the house of representatives. we need 30 votes
to see i increase my interest because these guys can't run a government, you're looking at going toward a recession where we're playing politics in washington. this is very serious. this is not just beltway rhetoric here. i think that people need to understand to the point of calling their congressional representative in outrage today saying, we should not be at this point. they're playing politics with the actual livelihood of families. this is not something that it will be all right a week or two or three or four. we start to go down that cliff, we don't know whether the momentum downward is going to be very, very damaging. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> you got na smirk on your face. >> maybe. i agree with the reverend that they're playing politics with livelihoods, because it is a huge risk. you're right about that. i disagree a little bit on the sort of dramatic, immediate impact of it. what we could get -- this is a possibility, and i'm trying to be optimistic because it's towards the end of the year. it's been crummy for a lot of people. we could get a deal the third week of january where
would only fund the government for eight days. >> the senate is set to reconvene sunday at 1:00 eastern time. the house expected to be in session sunday. are going to start around 2:00 with the first votes coming around 6:30 p.m. let's head on over to the white house. kristen welker standing by. a lot happening in washington, d.c. a lot happening i would assume at the white house. but how engaged is the presidented to in moving this thing forward? >> reporter: good afternoon, t.j. i am told there are conversations going on at the staff level. as you know, he met with congressional leaders here at the white house for about an hour on friday. now sources who are familiar with that conversation tell me that the president essentially said to lawmakers, you have two options. one, come up with a plan that can make its way through both chambers, or allow his proposal to go through a vote in both chambers. and that's what you heard the president referencing in that sound bite that you just aired, t.j. in the president's proposal it calls for extending the bush era tax cuts for those making $250
it in their paycheck and they will after january 1. the government will be taking more out of their paychecks and when the tax time will roll by in april, they'll feel it and businesses will feel it. once people will see they're losing money on this deal you'll see more public outrage about it. >> david naka, mura, calling for an up or down vote if the senate can't come up with it. he's talking about 250,000, at one point 400,000. is it realistic to think that the president can win this thing on an up or down vote? >> if they actually go to an up and down vote there will be a lot of pressure on those who were against a temporary fix with this to make their case known and actually go on the record. that's why the question is would the republican senators who would oppose this thing at the $250,000 level, they would use some of the mechanisms they have like the fill buster and things that the public doesn't like, but they're certainly part of the tools that the senators have to object to these things. would they block it? as mark murray said, this is about the blame game and setting up and if you'll blo
norquist and his pledge? >> it's odd because grover was the one sort of outside government institution on the conservative side who agreed with speaker boehner's plan "b" which would have allowed taxes to go up above $1 million in income. all the other conservative groups say no. i think grover's pledge, i don't know where it goes from here. obviously is doesn't have as much teeth as is it did because there are people who are willing to buck it. >> i think the key thing with the grover pledge though is that republicans feel like they're in such a corner here, the house is in disarray, boehner doesn't really know where his caucus is going to go. they're not really worried about grover's pledge. they're more worried about rebuilding the party and surviving this horrible moment when they barely control one chamber. >> okay. so i want to run this by you. charles krauthammer from "the washington post" has suggested this kind of complicated theory that the president has a bigger plan here. wonder if we can play this tape of what he says the president's strategy is. >> he's been using this, a
's was 1996. that was during the government shutdown. this is really a rare occurrence for members of congress to have to come back and work out legislation that they went able to get done before the christmas holiday. >> the president is supposed to stay there for how long? >> well, of course, the white house not really giving us specifics about the president's travel plans at this point in time. the reality is i think the president is himself trying to figure out what he is going to do, but we do expect that he will cut his vacation short. you've heard the president himself during his press conference on friday say i will be seeing you all next week. i think that it is very likely that we will see president obama back in d.c. later on this week and also taking part in those negotiations. >> last but not least, do you have on flip-flops? >> no, not yet. >> i'm looking at wi kiki behind you, and i'm jealous. i have to say i think anybody that's seeing this all right now, we are all jealous. >> it is beautiful here. it's a great assignment. >> i know. happy holidays. thanks, kristen. >>> with t
they see their paycheck next year. it's almost certain that the government will not extend the payroll tax holiday. that means a 2% tax increase for every last one of us. joining me is gerald bernstein, a senior fellow at the center of budget and policy priorities. get the title out. let's get to business. why are we not talking about this? talking about the cliff, but everybody's taxes going up with the payroll tax holiday. >>ith a great question, t.j. an important and underappreciated part of the fiscal cliff. the answer to the why is it really doesn't have any champions. when you hear the list of things people fighting for, estate tax, you hear the unemployment extension, things like that. you don't even hear this listed anymore. i know for a fact that the white house was fighting for this. they understand how important it is to people's paychecks, but how important to the overall economy. actually $100 billion, taking out of the 2013 economy at a time when paychecks have been stagnant. an unfortunate loss. >> let's take a look at the rest of this deal. the payroll tax holiday. everybod
financial gifts from the government, and then work very aggressively to turn them out to vote, and that strategy worked. >> that explanation got mitt romney attacked and condemned by the likes of bobby jindahl and other republicans. they're now trying a new approach. tag romney said this about his father. he wanted to be president less than anyone i knew in my entire life. he had no desire to run, says tag, who worked with his mother and to persuade his father to seek the presidency. if he could have found someone else to take his place, he would have been ecstatic to step aside. too bad he never told newt gingrich that. joining me now, msnbc's joy reed. i'm on the verge of feeling sorry for them, trying to come up with these crazy reasons about why he lost. and now they want to pretend that this guy who lived his whole life in order to run for president didn't really want to run for president. >> yeah, i know, lawrence. there is nothing more failing than failing to win something and say, i didn't want to win, anyway. who wants that. the problem with that, of course, is the hi
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)